I WANT YOU by Uncle Sam – Where does it come from?

Hello, Everyone,

One of the greatest rewards of being a teacher is to be constantly learning.

After being questioned by one of my students this week, for instance, I´ve learned some more.

Even though I was aware of the fact that Abraham Lincoln had been one of the inspirations for the character who portrays somewhat the image and symbol of America today; doing a more extensive research on the topic, I realized that there have been so many curious facts about the Uncle Sam figure. 

And the sentence I WANT YOU has been used by Army ro recruit American youngsters all over the country.

 Uncle Sam is a common national personification of the American government originally used during the War of 1812. He is depicted as a stern elderly man with white hair and a goatee beard. Typically he is dressed in clothing that recalls the design elements of the flag of the United States—for example, a top hat with red and white stripes and white stars on a blue band, and red and white striped trousers. The first use of Uncle Sam in literature was in the 1816 allegorical book The Adventures of Uncle Sam in Search After His Lost Honor by Frederick Augustus Fidfaddy, Esq.

Earlier representative figures of the United States included such beings as “Brother Jonathan,” used by Punch magazine. These were overtaken by Uncle Sam somewhere around the time of the Civil War. The female personification “Columbia” has seldom been seen since the 1920s. The well-known “recruitment” image of Uncle Sam was created by James Montgomery Flagg, an illustrator and portrait artist best known for commercial art. The image of Uncle Sam was shown publicly for the first time, according to some, in a picture by Flagg on the cover of the magazine Leslie’s Weekly, on July 6, 1916, with the caption “What Are You Doing for Preparedness?”[1][2] More than four million copies of this image were printed between 1917 and 1918. The image also was used extensively during World War II.

 There are two memorials to Uncle Sam, both of which commemorate the life of Samuel Wilson: the Uncle Sam Memorial Statue in Arlington, Massachusetts, his birthplace; and a memorial near his long-term residence in Riverfront Park, Troy, New York.

SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

About Prof. and Interpreter Luiz C. Carvalho

EM PORTUGUÊS (SEE BELOW FOR ENGLISH VERSION) Luiz Claudio Carvalho, Professor, Tradutor, Interprete e Locutor(Voice-over) profissional, tem mais de 23 anos de experiência como professor de inglês, na área de treinamento de professores, tradução e interpretação. Luiz é um incansável aprendiz da língua inglesa que procura o melhor para os seus alunos e para aqueles que querem fazer uso de seu profissionalismo nas respectivas areas. Sua experiência e especialização no idioma podem ser resumidos pela aquisição com sucesso dos certificados de proficiência mais renomados no idioma, tais como os das universidades de CAMBRIDGE, OXFORD, MICHIGAN, LYNN UNIVERSITY, FAU, Miami Dade College, entre outras. Nos últimos 10 anos, Luiz Claudio Carvalho esteve residindo nos Estados Unidos e viajando por toda a América, lecionando inglês como segunda língua e português para norte-americanos e canadenses, trabalhando como intérprete e tradutor, mas com foco sempre em desenvolver novas técnicas, aprimorar metodologia e observar na prática explorando técnicas adequadas para acelerar o processo de aprendizagem do idioma. Através dessa oportunidade e experiência, o Prof. Luiz Carvalho desenvolveu o curso INTERaction: Um curso voltado especificamente para conversação, onde as principais estruturas gramaticais são contextualizadas de uma forma agradável e dinâmica muito peculiar, com o intuito de tornar você, estudante de inglês, um falante nato da língua no menor espaço de tempo possível. E-mail: luizcarv@hotmail.com or luizcarvalhobrazil@gmail.com
This entry was posted in INGLÊS - ENGLISH. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s